wocket in my pocket

Looking for the unexpected in the mundane.

Growing Up

on April 27, 2015

The conversation at the supper table was all about what we want to be when we grow up. Of course, the children have no idea what I want to be when I grow up, since they hold the erroneous assumption that I have now reached what I want to be and it’s all downhill from here.

Gregory likes art and books, so he may be looking at a life as a librarian or a teacher. Olivia wants to be a nurse and Rita is dithering between being a doctor or an artist, presumably once one side of her brain gets precedence over the other side. Alex isn’t saying, because he is old enough to know that he will change his mind, most likely. The other children say he will be an engineer or a preacher or an inventor or something leaderish. 🙂 As for Addy, she is earnestly anticipating a career as a peaceful Indian. She also has grand delusions about all the amazing presents she will give us all once she grows up, chests of gold and jewels for the ladies, cars for the boys, anything they want. Given her current circumstances, she had better look for lost pirate hoards when she gets big.

I was struck by something. In my somewhat sheltered childhood, I never mentioned any of the things they said they want to be, because it simply wasn’t done. (Actually, I do remember the librarian dream, because I couldn’t imagine any happier place than surrounded by books.) Higher education wasn’t done. People stayed close to their roots and happily raised families very similar to how they themselves were raised. I think the simplicity tended to an almost idyllic peacefulness. Sometimes I wonder what I would have chosen to study if I would have had the option of going to college. But I was much too conventional to push for anything that would have rocked the boat. It was part of the culture and I didn’t really consider venturing outside of the safety of our world.

Did you ever have a moment when you wondered, “This? This… hard work… is what I spent all that effort growing up for?” And you want to tell the children to just slow down and enjoy their Ranger Rick and Legos and being told what to do and when to go to bed. Not to sound negative, or anything, but there are times when I wish to run from responsibilities, to stop being the tired middle-aged person with all this stuff on her mind and this back log of things that need to be done, the passel of grubby children needing attention.

At those times, I hear this voice in my head, (It might be Elisabeth Elliot or Sally Clarkson or Rachel Jankovic or even Marabel Morgan…) “Stop whining,” it says. “This is life, all this stuff that needs to be done today is life, and you get to live it. What did you want? A useful sojourn in a coffee shop, scrolling through social media and posting gorgeous pictures of your outfit and your new sunglasses?” If I don’t feel sufficiently chastened by this inner voice, I want to be sassy and say, “No, but I would take a cook and a maid so I can at least be lazy over coffee and finish this book.” Then I laugh at myself and set myself to the task of learning to enjoy the things that need to be done. I make it a practice to look into my children’s faces, wash the grime off tenderly, feel the different bone structures, sense the miracle of these little people. And I look for things to laugh about.

Last week our blueberries came, the ones Gabe ordered for containers on the deck. Tophat blueberries, they are called in the catalogs. I called him, excited, and said, “The ‘tow-fat’ blueberries are here!” He was quiet in a Huh? kind of way, then kindly said, “Honey. Those are top-hat blueberries.” The resulting fit of giggles grew into near hysteria. It was precisely what I needed to release some of the stresses I was having a hard time dealing with.

Maybe someday I will be grown up enough that it all comes effortlessly. I hope that when I get big, serving others joyfully will have become my default mode. Raising a family certainly should give us enough practice, not?

I mentioned that I am reading Sally Clarkson’s new book, Own Your Life. I am being challenged to identify sources of chaos in my life, things that divide my heart and make me unthankful, interruptions that I bring upon myself. For this season, it is a very convicting read for me. I am taking it chapter by chapter, searching my heart and letting God’s Spirit speak to me. When I am done with the book, I will do a review. 🙂

Chin up, my friends. The best is yet to come! Oh yes, it is!

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and now, just for fun… artist unknown.

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9 responses to “Growing Up

  1. Rhonda says:

    Thank you for this! There’s a reason we are told, ” In everything give thanks”. He knows us!

  2. Becca says:

    Ooh, yes thanks for being real and encouraging once again. And if it helps any, I also thought that’s what the blueberries were called until I read further… 🙂

  3. Luci says:

    I read “tow-fat” too. 🙂
    I really, really love everything about this post! The picture sums it up beautifully.
    We have a little surgeon daughter on our hands. And a preacher son.
    I think I need to read Sally Clarkson, though the conviction part is never fun.
    Thanks for once again helping me to see beauty in the grubby.

  4. El says:

    This post is beautiful. It speaks to my heart and lots more eloquent things but I have a 2 yr old who is distressed because he didn’t hug and tiss daddy and wants my arm “this way” around him.

  5. Linda Horst says:

    How I would love to have coffee with you- and I promise we would actually be intensely watching each other’s faces and engaging in real life, with all the social media safely under lock and key. You’re a good decade ahead of me in the motherhood journey and I appreciate hearing your perspective from that viewpoint.
    Each of the children’s aspirations is fascinating but I would have to say Addy’s is my favorite. Hug her colorful little self for me, ok?
    Here’s a request for a future post- What I Would Tell My Younger Self/What I Would Tell Myself as a New Mother. Thanks in advance 🙂

  6. Rachel says:

    yeah, I wanna hear that too, Linda. And little Add- priceless!

  7. Ada says:

    Ahhh , Thank-you for this! Sometimes or rather a lot of times we simply need to lighten up and just have a knee-slappin laugh! It is an awesome stress reliever! 🙂

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